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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 10:57 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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heatherhev1 wrote:
Hi I had this problem too it lasted a week after about 6 weeks after my kitten arrived and this is my discovery. I took my boy to the vets, he had pro-biotic paste, anti biotics and nothing worked. I researched the Bengal diet and realised a few things. Bengals as we know have sensitive tummies and can be intollerant to foods such as grain, maize, beef, and fish. They cannot digest processed meat that well some much worse than others. I completely changed my cat's diet to hypoalergenic dry food and I now raw feed him from a company that is veteneriary approved. They use human grade meats specific to their biological requirements. He was all better within 12 hrs and now he is growing fast, he is much healthier and happier and he does not even have smelly poo as raw feeding means less pooing and not at all smelly. it literally has the consistency of crumbling soil it is dry as there is less nastiness in the diet. In the wild cats will hunt and catch their live prey to eat. They are designed to eat raw muscle meat and soft bone so I thought it best to feed my part wild baby a species appropriate diet suitable for his digestion. the meat does not contain guts so no parasites as the guts are where they live, salmonela not an issue as cats already have it living in their gut naturally and bacterial infection non existent as the acidic ph within a cats gut is sooo high that very little would survive it. This is because cats are designed to eat raw meat so their bodies cope with it. canned food is packed with fillers and processed and still cooked so most of the enzymes a cat requires are lost and then they get sick. Especially the Bengal. The raw meat mince mix I use is made with high grade meats, and supplemented with vitamins and minerals that will boost everything within your cats system inside and out, such as sea kelp, bilberry and brewers yeast. He has loads of energy all the time, his coat hardly malts and it really glistens! one very happy kitty indeed. Hope this helps.


I do realise that this was an old thread before being resurrected but there are some points in the reply i quoted i just want to respond to as i feel they may give someone the wrong idea.

Bengals do not need a different diet to any other domestic breed of cat. They are not more intollerant to things like grain, beef and fish. And they do not have mroe sensitive tummies. These are very common myths that you will find written about bengals on the internet (like they are immune to FELV so do not need to be vaccinated). Pedigree cats in general have often been bred in quite clean environments and weaned onto specific foods so that when they are introduced to anything else their tummies respond fairly quickly. They can digest processed meat, many more bengals eat processed cat food than a raw diet and they are not all going to die young because of malnutrition.

The kind of picture posted by the OP and many others is one that is very indicative of a parasite infection called Tritrichomonas Foetus (TF) it is actually very common in pedigree cats especially Bengals! It is not detected in the normal poo tests that vets perform and is only detected by a PCR or QPCR test which vets have to send off. Vets do not seem to remember/know about it to test for, so often gets missed. It requires specific sampling and a specific antibiotic called Ronidazole. Left untreated it may eventually disappear but more often lies dormant in the intestines to resurface when the cat is ill/stressed or another cat is introduced to the house. It can cause irreversible damage to the lining of the intestines causing long term issues (my eldest tonk nearly died from pancreatitis caused by TF and now has IBS).

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 8:57 am 
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Not intending to give anyone the wrong idea just wanting to share my ideas and experience on this subject, I have in other threads on the same subject said that there is no one definitive answer for every cat some cats respond well to canned some don't, mine didn't and now have had no problems. I do believe in feeding in accordance with what the cats system is geared to process and do feel the biological reasoning behind it is valid but by no means want to give false information. My infomation offered is not a personal opnion, it is the opinion of many others and many qualified vets who choose to take the homeopathic route, it is merely an alternative backed by many professionals but sadly not most.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 10:24 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Location: Leicestershire, UK
heatherhev1 wrote:
Not intending to give anyone the wrong idea just wanting to share my ideas and experience on this subject, I have in other threads on the same subject said that there is no one definitive answer for every cat some cats respond well to canned some don't, mine didn't and now have had no problems. I do believe in feeding in accordance with what the cats system is geared to process and do feel the biological reasoning behind it is valid but by no means want to give false information. My infomation offered is not a personal opnion, it is the opinion of many others and many qualified vets who choose to take the homeopathic route, it is merely an alternative backed by many professionals but sadly not most.


My cats are actually fed a raw diet with some canned as well. I wean my kittens onto raw, as well as some canned as i don't want them to have tummy issues when going to their new homes. I advocate a raw diet myself for the reasons that it is the easiest for a cat to digest and not because bengals are more intollerant than other cats to processed food and grain because that is untrue. The vast majority of professionals do not advocate raw feeding, quite the opposite.

I responded to what you wrote because you said things like: They cannot digest processed meat that well some much worse than others. And: Bengals as we know have sensitive tummies . Which are common bengal myths. Bengals do not have sensitive tummies and they can digest processed meat. Some have issues just like some other cats have issues. Bengals are not the only breed of cat to occasionally find one with a sensitive tum etc. There are lots on here but this is a Bengal forum and people tend to hunt out answers to problems online and find forums like this, the vast majority of bengal owners do not go online to forums and such and eat normal cat food. Whilst i agree with you that some do have problems i do not agree that bengals need a different diet to any other breed of cat which is what you were implying.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 10:40 am 
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Bengal Cat

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Thank you Lollo for sharing your knowledge with me on this topic and I am grateful for the input as it gives us all a more balanced array of knowledge. I take on everything you say as well as others too. My info is mostly from my vet, and I take a lot of advice from some breeder contacts I have and of course this site has been very helpful. It was my vet who mentioned that of all the breeds she sees with tummy trouble and intollerances in her expereince her surgey sees a vast quantity of Bengals with the complaint, So I guess with that said and the myth that has been around for a while it stands to reason why I took this to be a truth. You show me a different side to things and I openly accept that too and find it very interesting to learn about. Many thanks.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2018 6:29 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

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Smelly diarrhea that gradually resolves is often Tritrichomonas Foetus (TF). I am finding most vets in the USA don't know how to test for it or treat it and many are not aware of it. Therefore it remains under diagnosed as a fussy stomach. The diarrhea often stops as the cat gets older but the cat remains contagious. It is caused by a protozoan apparently common in Bengal cats. Zoologix in California, has a feline diarrhea PCR panel that a cat owner or breeder can use to identify causes of diarrhea including TF. It costs much less than going to the vet for diagnosis. However you need a vet for treatment. Ronidazole is a pill currently used to treat TF. It is harsh on a cats' neurological system and needs to be closely watched by a qualified veterinarian. I gained this information from a well informed breeder, internet searching, and calling veterinarians. Hope it helps!


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