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 Post subject: Mature or kitten?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 2:15 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Mon Mar 11, 2019 2:03 pm
Posts: 2
Hi, I am after some advice please? A few years ago our Bengal ''Simi'' sadly passed away due to old age, she had an asthma problem and the vets pills and inhaler did help but she was old and we think it eventually got the better of her.
Since Simi's passing we have had another child who is now 3, we feel he is old enough now to be able to deal with another cat properly and we feel that another Bengal would be ideal.
I have seen mature ex breeding cats for sale and also kittens, I think a mature cat might be best around young kids?
Ideally I would like a male and he would have to be an outdoor cat as we live in the middle of nowhere and have a large , secure garden. Simi was an indoor cat and quite timid but I feel that cats should be able to go outside when ever they please, especially with two kids in the house, I dont think a timid indoor cat would be a good match with a 3 year old boy.

Any advice guys on buying a mature Bengal male? Would an ex breeding cat be an outdoor cat?

Im not looking for show winners, dont really care about pedigree papers etc, so long as it has the Bengal temperament and confidence I am happy.


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 Post subject: Re: Mature or kitten?
PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2019 4:20 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 9122
I am sorry to hear about your other kitty passing away. It's always devastating to lose a family member.

If you are looking for a mature bengal, your best bet is through the Bengal Rescue Network or a breeder who is retiring a stud. Know that most breeders have specific rules that you cannot allow the bengal outdoors without supervision. That's not to say that owners don't let their cats out anyway or even declaw them (most breeder contracts stipulate no declawing). Breeders want their cats to go to good, responsible owners. And many will ask point blank, "are you planning on allowing this cat to be outdoors?" Rescues could have the same requirements.

However, allowing a cat outdoor access is a decision to be made by the owner. A secure garden would be ideal for a cat -- know that a retired stud has not had free access to anything but maybe a small outdoor cat run. And, naturally, a secure garden would be the place to start allowing a cat outside as they need to get their scent in the area in order to find their way home. Know, too, that a neutered stud is still going to mark territory. So an outdoor area is really necessary for him. I'm guessing you would not have time to train a bengal to walk on a harness and leash.

A kitten? Three year old children understand how to calmly pet and carefully hold a kitten. But, kittens do still scratch. I just worry more about a retired stud who is not well socialized due to being kept separated from the queens in a cattery.

I can only suggest you do your research until you find the perfect cat for your family.


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 Post subject: Re: Mature or kitten?
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:33 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 1:00 am
Posts: 4463
Location: Portland Oregon, USA
Sherry wrote:
A kitten? Three year old children understand how to calmly pet and carefully hold a kitten. But, kittens do still scratch. I just worry more about a retired stud who is not well socialized due to being kept separated from the queens in a cattery.


I agree with this. If I were in your shoes, I would probably go for a kitten, or at least avoid ex-stud cats. I've never interacted with one, but from what I've read, they often don't exactly lead the best lives as a stud. So I would actually go out of my way to avoid a cat like that, and make socialization your #1 priority.

The other thing that is nice about really young cats, is that they haven't yet become "curmudgeonly". Kittens don't really have a strongly formed opinion about what "normal" is and insist that things fit into their paradigm. Loud, obnoxious, unpredictable kid? Sure! Potential playmate and BFF to a kitten. One downside of a kitten, is the "getting scratched up" part, which is fairly unavoidable. I would say that you could keep your kitty's claws trimmed to help with that, but you wouldn't want to do that if he's going to be living outside in the wild. That may also be an issue in getting a cat, as, depending on where you live, many breeders and shelters insist and make you pledge that your kitty will not be living outside (or "inside/outside") as a condition of the adoption.

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