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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 2:30 pm 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 pm
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I'm on the list to get a Bengal kitten! I have had cats before, but this will be my first Bengal. The kitten I selected is a boy, and will be neutered at 12 weeks. I've been reading up on these boards in preparation ... and I noticed that someone said that even neutered males will spray. I've never had a neutered male spray before. Is this common? If so, I think I may need to switch to a female...

Thanks in advance!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:39 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2008 11:07 am
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My neutered male does not spray... My parents have just run of the mill stray cats that are neutered and one of the two males sprays. He was neutered when they found him so no telling what age he was neutered at and he is indoor/outdoor so it may be that as well.

Actually female cats can spray too.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 10:51 am 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 pm
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Thanks for the answer! I've never had a neutered/spayed cat spray before, as long as they were fixed before maturity ... and this one is important, because I have asthma. I am okay with cats (though I am looking forward to hopefully a somewhat smaller allergic reaction), but I doubt that my breathing would do well in an environment of spraying cats. I've heard that it's near impossible to completely clean cat spray.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:15 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2015 9:44 pm
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I've had 2 males now and both were neutered at 8 months but I have never had an issue with spraying or inappropriate urinating they have always been impeccable with using their litter boxes and so is my girl.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:29 pm 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 pm
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Awesome! :biggrin: Thanks for the response! Hopefully my boy will also be as good.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 6:25 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 9131
Welcome to the forum. The fact is both males AND females spray! The key to not having them spray is to have them fixed before sexual maturity and KEEP THE CATS INSIDE AND NEVER LET THEM OUTDOORS.

My bengals was neutered at 12 weeks. His previous owner allowed him to roam the neighborhood and now I have him -- he sprays. He sprays in the house, he sprays all the shrubs on our walks. The key for me is to get him out on his walks before he decides to spray in the house. Aggravating, YES!!! But, cats mark for territory -- both male and female. It can happen if you ever get another cat in the household. I think as long as your boy stays in the house and you don't have an issue with stray cats coming around your home, you may be fine and he will never spray.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 6:44 pm 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 pm
Posts: 47
So if I teach my Bengal to walk on a leash outside, he will start spraying? ... I was hoping to be able to take him for walks. :sad:

What do you guys do if the cat sprays? How can you clean it so that it doesn't stink up the house?

And thanks for the welcome! :)


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:17 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 1:00 am
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Location: Portland Oregon, USA
Some thoughts on this...

1. Nobody can make any guarantees that your cat won't spray, male or female! This is just one of many issues you may have to work through as a cat guardian, so if you commit to this you have to commit to working through it, if it happens. Some cats have medical issues which make them go outside the box. Some have personalities where they just stress about everything that causes them to spray, and then cat owners often can un-wittingly cause a problem with spraying by providing a stressful or territorially challenged environment, or providing insufficient places that your cat deems "sufficient" to meet his elimination needs. Honestly, if this is at the top of your list of concerns, perhaps the first question to your breeder ought to be something along the lines of: which if your kittens has the best litterbox habits?

2. The environment that you provide your cat will influence the probability of him/her spraying. Things that you have some control over are how stressed out your cat is, and how territorially threatened your cat is. So read up on that, learn more about it, and you lessen the chance of spraying happening, help "fix" it if/when it does, and provide a better environment for your cat in general. "Total Cat Mojo" (or many similar books) is a pretty good place to start.

3. All of that said, I have to admit that I have a bias towards female cats, and part of it is the perceived increased risk of spraying. But that's not based on any science or statistical analysis that I've seen, mostly it's based on experiences I had as a kid with indoor/outdoor kitties that my family had. Just a silly bias for the most part. I may, in the future, get male cats.

4. How to clean it up when/if it happens: First thing is get a black light, and second is getting special enzymatic cleaner. They sell that stuff at any pet store. Nature's Miracle, works well. When buying one, make sure it specifically mentions cats, enzymatic, and urine. If it doesn't mention those, be skeptical! But unfortunately, not all messes can really be cleaned up. Getting it off of a wall is easy, getting it off a rug is usually do-able (they sell enzymatic carpet cleaner that you can use in a bissell for example), getting it out of something like a pillow or mattress or sofa is often impossible, once the pee has really sunk into it.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:30 pm 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 pm
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I see a distinction between bad litter box habits and spraying. I have had cats go outside of the litterbox, and while I dislike it, I can handle it. I can clean it up so it doesn't stink up my house. From my understanding, however, spraying is different. Spraying has different scent markers? I think? It is also a different action than regular urination. I'm worried about spraying, not about peeing outside the litter box.

Thanks for the book idea to read. I feel very comfortable in creating cat-friendly environments, because while I'm new to Bengals, I'm not new to cats. None of the cats I have had have ever sprayed in the house. However, it may help with specific reference to reducing the risk of spraying.

Thank you for the idea of how to clean it up. I'll have to look into those!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 4:16 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 9131
The issue with your kitty going out on a leash is that there may be scents from other cats out there -- unless your area is completely void of any outdoor cats. If that is the case, you are lucky! It may also be determined by how far you end up walking. If you stay in your yard, things may be fine! It is really a guess whether or not your boy would ever spray. It's instinct with them -- and the it's part of a cat's nature -- even in the wild. I also have a domestic shorthair that was neutered when he was a year old -- he was kept outside by his previous owner. I took him in when they moved. He sprays like a fireboat. He is allowed in my house and has never sprayed in the house.

Brian is correct -- a black light is essential. They are very inexpensive and available online or at pet stores. A good enzymatic cleaner is also necessary to clean the urine completely.

I honestly do not want to scare you -- because your boy or girl may NEVER spray, regardless. If you are prepared for it and ready to deal with it if and when it happens, you will be relieved when it does not.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:42 pm 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 pm
Posts: 47
I appreciate all the advice! I'll have to think about the leash walking... and get a black light and stuff to clean.

And no, my yard is definitely not devoid of cats. I live near the woods, and about every couple of years I find kittens from half-feral cats under my house. I do my best to rehome them as I can, but... yeah, there's going to be other cats around.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:59 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Location: Portland Oregon, USA
I'm very partial to these:

https://smile.amazon.com/KOBRA-UV-Black ... ight&psc=1

As far as the distinction between spraying and going outside the box... I don't doubt that. But as a practical matter, whether your cat decides to pee on the wall because the litterbox is full and junky, or whether it is because there is another cat staring at her from outside the window and she needs to mark territory, the result is essentially the same.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 1:40 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
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Many times, stray cats coming onto your property can be a huge issue! The key is to keep them away. Hard to do. Just ask "Tabitha." But .... I know neutered male cats who live among other cats and have never sprayed. This same friend had a fixed female who would spray constantly. One would think a spraying cat would entice the other fixed cats (there were five total) to also spray, but she only had ONE that sprayed.

Please do not let this consume you -- enjoy the kitty. He may never spray -- regardless.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:58 am 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 pm
Posts: 47
Thanks, I've got the black light bookmarked to get!

I appreciate the advice, and the encouragement. Mostly, as much as I have had cats, I've never had them spray. It surprises me that you guys say it's the same, because other cat owners (non-Bengals) have told me that the spray is much worse than peeing outside the litterbox. Ah well. Hopefully I'll never find out. ;).

I guess I'll cross the bridge when I get there!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 4:27 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 9131
Urine is urine. In the litter box, the odor is consumed by the litter. When they spray a wall or a vertical surface (many times furniture that absorbs the urine), the smell can be overwhelming. Regardless, please buy something like Natures Miracle to have on hand in the event something happens. It is also great to cleaning and deodorizing if the cat has an accident outside of the litter box. I think it's great you want to consider all avenues of this ... but I am hopeful it will not be an issue for you or your kitty.


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